Harvey Ruvin - Clerk of the Courts - Miami-Dade County, Florida

Value Adjustment Board - FAQ's

10. What happens after the VAB decision?

11. If I win my case, how long do I have to wait for a refund of my Property Taxes?

12. If I succeed in getting my taxes lowered this year, will my taxes remain the same next year?

13. Where can I obtain a record of my hearing and how much will it cost?

14. Where do I appeal if I am dissatisfied with the decision of the VAB in my case and what is the deadline for filing the appeal?

15. When are the tax rolls certified by the VAB and the Property Appraiser?

16. Who will hear my case when I appear for my VAB hearing?

17. Can I still file for my property tax exemption after the statutory deadline?

18. VAB Meeting Minutes.

 

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10. What happens after the VAB decision? If the petitioner accepts the VAB's decision regarding the petition, no further action is required. If, however, the petitioner disagrees with the VAB's decision and wishes to continue to contest the VAB’s assessed value or the denial of an exemption or agricultural classification, the petitioner must file a lawsuit in the Circuit Court in accordance with section 194.171, Florida Statutes. By doing so, the petitioner places into the hands of the Court the determination as to whether the assessed value by the Property Appraiser's Office exceeds the market value of the petitioner's property, or whether an exemption or agricultural classification was wrongfully denied. If a property owner does not file a petition with the VAB, a lawsuit can still be filed in Circuit Court under Florida Law. Deadlines for filing a case should be obtained from one's attorney or the Property Appraiser's Office. The dates are different depending on whether or not a petition was filed with the VAB.
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 11. If I win my case, how long do I have to wait for a refund of my Property Taxes?Tax refunds are issued only in cases where the VAB reduces the "assessed" value of the property under appeal or grants an exemption or agricultural classification resulting in a reduced tax liability. Tax refunds resulting from VAB hearings usually take six to eight weeks from the time the hearings are held. However, during certain times of the year refunds may be issued earlier or later than usual.
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 12. If I succeed in getting my taxes lowered this year, will my taxes remain the same next year?Not necessarily. The Property Appraiser is required by law to assess your property on an annual basis as of January 1st. As such, there can be no guarantee that your taxes will remain unchanged.
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13. Where can I obtain a record of my hearing and how much will it cost?Contact the VAB for information on how to order a record of a VAB hearing. All hearings are recorded on videotape, copies of which can be ordered at a cost of $10.00 per agenda number up to $35.00 for the entire hearing date.
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14. Where do I appeal if I am dissatisfied with the decision of the VAB in my case and what is the deadline for filing the appeal?A taxpayer who is dissatisfied with the final VAB decision may file a taxpayer suit in Circuit Court. This is not an appeal that reviews the Special Magistrate’s recommended decision. Rather, the taxpayer is starting again with a new lawsuit. For more information pertaining to court filing deadlines for taxpayer suits, please see Florida Statutes sections 194.171 and 196.151 (the latter statute pertains to Homestead Exemption denials).
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15.  When are the tax rolls certified by the VAB and the Property Appraiser?A "preliminary" certification of the Tax Rolls, including all properties whether or not under appeal with the VAB, is performed by the VAB and the Property Appraiser's Office in October of the subject tax year. A second "final" certification of only properties under appeal with the VAB (reflecting all VAB changes) is performed after all VAB hearings are completed.
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16. Who will hear my case when I appear for my VAB hearing?If you are appealing the assessed value of your property, your case will be heard by an "Appraiser Special Magistrate" who is a qualified professional appraiser familiar with property valuation. If you are contesting the denial of a tax exemption or agricultural classification, your case will be heard by an "Attorney Special Magistrate" who is familiar with property tax law.
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